Technical Program
Plenaries
Special Sessions
Preliminary program listing (subject to changes)
Final Program at a Glance
Final Book of Abstracts

 

Aside from the technical sessions, the 2007 CDC will feature two plenary lectures plus the Bode lecture. The plenary speakers will be Prof. Peyton Young of the University of Oxford and Professor Tryphon Georgiou of the University of Minnesota. The Bode lecture will be presented by Prof. P. S. Krishnaprasad of the University of Maryland. In addition, Professor Bozenna Pasik-Duncan will be conducting a workshop for high school students in the area. On-line listing of the preliminary program can be accessed through PaperPlaza. This listing is subject to changes.

CDC Plenaries and Bode Lecture:

Plenaries: We will have a plenary on Wednesday, Dec. 12 and Thursday, Dec. 13, in the Grand Ballroom, Sections A and B

 
  • Tryphon Georgiou. Wednesday Dec. 12, 2007, 8:30 AM. Grand Ballroom AB
    Plenary Title. The Meaning of Distance in Spectral Analysis
    Plenary Abstract.

    The analysis of signals into constituent harmonics and the estimation of their power distribution are considered fundamental to systems engineering. Due to its significance in modeling and identification, spectral analysis is in fact a "hidden technology" in a wide range of application areas, and a variety of sensor technologies, ranging from radar to medical imaging, rely critically upon efficient ways to estimate the power distribution from recorded signals. Robustness and accuracy are of at most importance, yet there is no universal agreement on how these are to be quantified. Thus, in this talk we will motivate the need for ways to compare power spectral distributions.

    Metrics, in any field of scientific endeavor, must relate to physically meaningful properties of the objects under consideration. In this spirit, we will discuss certain natural notions of distance between power spectral densities. These will be motivated by problems in prediction theory and related properties of time-series. Analogies will be drawn with an old subject of a similar vein, that of quantifying distances between probability distributions, which has given rise to information geometry. The contrast and similarities between metrics will be highlighted by analyzing mechanical vibrations, speech, and visual tracking.



    Biography. Tryphon T. Georgiou was born in Athens, Greece, in 1956. He received the Diploma in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens, Greece, in 1979, and the Ph.D. degree from the University of Florida, Gainesville, in 1983. He has served on the faculty of Florida Atlantic (1983-1986) and Iowa State (1986-1989) Universities. Since 1989 he has been with the University of Minnesota where he is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, a co-director of the Control Science and Dynamical Systems Center (1990-present), and holds the Vincentine Hermes-Luh chair of Electrical Engineering. He has served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Trans. on Automatic Control, the SIAM Journal on Control and Optimization, and the Systems and Control Letters. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and has also served as an elected member of the Board of Governors of the Control Systems Society (2002-2005). His research interests lie in the areas of control engineering, systems, information theory, and applied mathematics. He is a co-recipient of the George Axelby Outstanding Paper awards of the IEEE Control Systems Society for the years 1992 and 1999, for joint works with M.C. Smith (Univ. of Cambridge), and for 2003, for joint work with C.I. Byrnes (Washington Univ., St. Louis) and A. Lindquist (KTH, Stockholm).

     
  • Peyton Young. Thursday Dec. 13, 2007, 8:30 AM. Grand Ballroom AB
    Plenary Title. Strategic Learning
    Plenary Abstract. Over the past decade, game theorists have made substantial progress in identifying simple learning heuristics that lead to equilibrium behavior without making unrealistic demands on agents’ information or computational abilities, as is the case in the ‘perfect rationality’ approach to game theory. Recent research shows that very complex, interactive systems can equilibrate even when agents have virtually no knowledge of the environment in which they are embedded. This talk will survey different approaches to the problem of learning in games, show the various senses in which learning rules converge to equilibrium, and sketch the theoretical limits to what is achievable.

    Biography.

    Peyton Young is James Meade Professor of Economics at Oxford University and a Senior Fellow in Economic Studies at The Brookings Institution in Washington. 

    He has published widely on game theory, bargaining and negotiation, public finance, political representation, voting, and distributive justice.   His books include Fair Representation (Yale University Press, 1982), Fair Allocation (American Mathematical Society, 1985, ed.), Cost Allocation: Methods, Principles, Applications (North-Holland, 1985), Negotiation Analysis (University of Michigan Press, 1991), Equity in Theory and Practice (Princeton University Press, 1994), Individual Strategy and Social Structure (Princeton University Press, 1998), and Strategic Learning and Its Limits (Oxford University Press, 2004).

    Professor Young is President of the Game Theory Society, a Fellow of the British Academy, a Fellow of the Econometric Society, and an External Faculty member of the Santa Fe Institute.

     
  • P. S. Krishnaprasad. Friday Dec. 14, 2007, 11 AM. Grand Ballroom AB
    Bode Lecture Title. Pursuit and Cohesion: in Nature and by Design
    Plenary Abstract.

    Pursuit phenomena in nature have a vital role in survival of species. In addition to prey-capture and mating behavior, pursuit phenomena appear to underlie territorial battles in certain species of insects. In this talk we discuss the geometric patterns in certain pursuit and prey capture phenomena in nature, and suggest sensorimotor feedback laws that explain such patterns. Our interest in this problem first arose from the study of a motion camouflage (stealth) hypothesis due to Srinivasan and his collaborators, and an investigation of insect capture behavior in the FM bat Eptesicus fuscus, initiated by Cynthia Moss. Models of interacting particles, developed in collaboration with Eric Justh, prove effective in formulating and deriving biologically plausible steering laws that lead to observed patterns.

    The echolocating bat E. fuscus perceives the world around it in the dark, primarily through the information it gathers rapidly and dependably by probing the environment through controlled streams of pulses of frequency modulated ultrasound. The returning echoes from scatterers such as obstacles (cave walls, trees), predators (barn owls) and prey (insects), are captured and transduced into neuronal spike trains by the highly sensitive auditory system of the bat, and processed in the sensorimotor pathways of the brain to steer the bat’s flight in purposeful behavior. In joint work with Kaushik Ghose, Timothy Horiuchi, Eric Justh, Cynthia Moss, and Viswanadha Reddy, we have begun to understand the control systems guiding the flight. The effectiveness of the bat in coping with, attenuation and noise, uncertainty of the environment, and sensorimotor delay, makes it a most interesting model system for engineers concerned with goal-directed and resource-constrained information processing in robotics. The bat’s neural realizations of auditory-motor feedback loops may serve as models for implementations of algorithms in robot designs.

    While the primary focus of this talk is on pursuit, the results suggest ways to synthesize interaction laws that yield cohesion in collections of particles, treating pursuit as a building block in mechanisms for flocking in nature and in engineered systems.

    Biography.

    P. S. Krishnaprasad received the Ph.D. degree from Harvard University in 1977. He taught in the Systems Engineering Department at Case Western Reserve University from 1977 to 1980. Since August 1980, he has been with the University of Maryland, where he now holds the position of Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering, with a joint appointment at the Institute for Systems Research. He also participates in the Program in Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computation, and the Program in Neuroscience and Cognitive Science. He has held short or long term visiting positions at Erasmus University, the University of Groningen, the University of California Berkeley, Caltech, Centre Interfacultaire Bernoulli in EPFL, Cornell University and Princeton University.

    Krishnaprasad's interests lie in the broad areas of geometric control theory, filtering and signal processing theory, robotics, acoustics, and biologically-inspired approaches to control, sensing and computation. He has made contributions to system identification, geometric mechanics, languages for robotics, actuation based on smart materials, and control of collectives. His current work is focused on pursuit and cohesion in nature and in engineered systems.

    P. S. Krishnaprasad was elected a Fellow of the IEEE in 1990. He was appointed a 1998-2000 Distinguished Faculty Research Fellow of the University of Maryland. He was the Munich Mathematical Colloquium Lecturer in October 2006.

     
    Special Sessions:
    The Power, Beauty and Excitement of the Cross-Boundaries Nature of Control
    NSF Special Session on Research Ethics and Related Issues in Research and Education
    Plain Talk on Control for a Wide Range of the Public
    NSF Transformative Research: Unique Opportunity for Control Engineering
    How to Present Your Work and Yourself
    Maple Connectivity Tools for Simulink®/MATLAB®
    Controls at United Technologies Research Center

    The Power, Beauty and Excitement of the Cross-Boundaries Nature of Control

    pasik_duncan

    Organizer:
    Bozenna Pasik-Duncan
    University of Kansas

    Workshop Co-Chairs:

    Bozenna Pasik- Duncan (University of Kansas)
    Pamela Whiffen, Scottsdale Unified School District, AZ

    Program Committee

    Kishan Baheti, NSF 
    Richard Murray, California Institute of Technology
    Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, University of Kansas
    Mark Spong, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign 
    Pamela Whiffen, Scottsdale Unified School District, AZ

    Sponsors:

    Technical Committee on Control Education of the Control Systems Society (CSS)
    Technical Committee on Education of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC)
    Technical Committee on Control Education of the American Automatic Control Council (AACC)


    Program:The Workshop aims to inspire interest from youth towards studies in Control Systems and to assist high school teachers in promoting the discipline of Control Systems among their students. It is composed of several short but effective presentations on various problems from the real world that have been solved by using control engineering methods, techniques and technologies. The Workshop brings together all-star teams of some of the most eminent senior control researchers and some of the most prominent younger researchers involved in new technologies to present control systems as an exciting and intellectually stimulating field. The attractiveness and excitement of choosing a career in control engineering will also be addressed. Live interaction between the presenters and the audience is to be an important feature of the Workshop. The Workshop is open to all participants of the CDC'07.

    Program

    Morning

    9: 00        Welcome
                   Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, Chair, CSS and AACC Committees on Control Education

    9: 30        The Power of Feedback
                   Theodore Djaferis, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    10: 00      When Computers Control: Joys and Perils of Automation
                   Christos Cassandras, Boston University

    10:30       Control in Mechatronics and Robotics
                   Mark Spong, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
     
    11:00       Passport activity

    11:10       Lunch Break (provided on site)

    Afternoon

    12:00       The Next Phase of the Information Technology Revolution
                   P.R. Kumar, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    12: 30       Turning a dollar into Billions
                   Shane Haas, Goldman Sachs in New York

      1: 00      Application of Control Theory to the Problem of Epilepsy
                   Ivan Osorio, Kansas University Medical Center,
                     and Mark Frei, Flint Hills Scientific, L.L.C.
     
    1: 30        Passport Activity/Door prizes
                    Discussion/ Evaluation of Workshop

    2:00         Farewell

     

     

    NSF Special Session on Research Ethics and Related Issues in Research and Education

    We 12:15 - 13:15

    Grand Ballroom A

    chowdhury

    Organizer:
    Fahmida N. Chowdhury
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette

     

    Chair:

     

    Karlene Hoo (Texas Tech University)

    Co-Chair:

    Bozenna Pasik-Duncan (University of Kansas)

    This NSF-sponsored special session will focus on ethics and related issues in research and education, NSF’s funding opportunities in these fields, and ideas for collaborative research on these issues. The session includes an invited presentation by a sociologist (stereotyping and evaluation bias) plus short talks (NSF funding programs in ethics in science and engineering, and broadening participation in engineering) by two NSF Program Officers, and an interactive Q&A period.

    Presentations:

    •  “Presentation on stereotyping and evaluation bias,” Nilanjana Dasgupta, University of Massachusetts, Amherst (20 min.)
    • “Presentation on NSF funding programs on ethics in science and engineering,” Myles Boylan, Program Director, Education and Human Resources, NSF (10 min.)
    • “Presentation on NSF efforts on broadening participation in engineering,” Mary Juhas , Program Directror for Diversity and Outreach, OAD, Engineering, NSF (10 min.)
    • “Panel discussion and Q&A,” Panelists: Myles Boylan, Mary Juhas, Nilanjana Dasgupta, Karlene Hoo, Bozenna Pasik-Duncan.  Panel moderator: Fahmida Chowdhury (20 min.)

     

     

    Plain Talk on Control for a Wide Range of the Public

    We 18:15 - 20:00

    Grand Ballroom A

    pasik_duncan

    Organizer:
    Bozenna Pasik-Duncan
    University of Kansas

    Chair:

    Bozenna Pasik-Duncan (University of Kansas)

    Co-Chair:

    Fahmida N. Chowdhury (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)

     

    Sponsored by:

     

    CSS and AACC Technical Committees on Control Education

    One of the major challenges for the controls community is to enhance its own public image and convey the essence and contribution of the field to outsiders; for this, a coordinated effort has to take place. This Special Session has as its purpose to prepare “Plain Talk about the Power, Beauty and Excitement of Control for the Non-Control Engineering Audience.” This series of talks will include a brief history of feedback control and provide a sample of short talks for a target audience of non-control engineering professionals and general public.

    Presentations:

    • “Introduction and Purpose of the Session,” Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, University of Kansas.
    • “The Power of Feedback,” Theodore Djaferis, University of Massachusetts Amherst.
    • “Joys and Perils of Automation,” Christos G. Cassandras, Dept. of Manufacturing Engineering and Center for Information and Systems Engineering Boston University.
    • “Control Education and the DARPA Grand Challenge,” Richard M. Murray, Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology.
    • “The Next Phase of the Information Technology Revolution,” P.R. Kumar, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
    • “Controlling Air Traffic,” Claire Tomlin, University of California, Berkeley.
    • “Control in Mechatronics and Robotics,” Mark Spong, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
    • “Some uses for Computer-Aided Control System Design Software in Control Education,” William S. Levine and Dimitrios Hristu-Varsakelis, University of Maryland.
    • “Application of Control Theory to the Problem of Epilepsy,” Ivan Osorio,University of Kansas Medical Center and Mark Frei, Flint Hills Scientific, L.L.C..
    • “Random walk around some problems in stochastic systems and control,” Dominique Duncan, Yale University, Tyrone Duncan and Bozenna Pasik-Duncan, University of Kansas.
    • “Understanding Phenomena through Real Physical Objects – Controlling Pendulum,” Katsuhisa Furuta, Tokyo Denki University, Japan.
    • “Risk Engineering – Past successes and future challenges,” John Baillieul, Intelligent Mechatronics Laboratory.

     


     

    NSF Transformative Research: Unique Opportunity for Control Engineering

    We 18:15 – 19:30

    Grand Ballroom B

    Organizers:

     

    kishan

    Kishan Baheti
    National Science Foundation

    eduardo    

    Eduardo Misawa
    National Science Foundation

    The National Science Foundation of USA is refocusing its grant making on “transformative” research to encourage “high risk” projects at the cutting edge of research instead of “sure thing” projects that promised only incremental advances. The goal of the session is to bring together researchers and students attending CDC and inform them about NSF priorities. NSF programs dealing with industry-university interactions and programs for international collaborations will be discussed. In addition, NSF’s bold five-year initiative on “Cyber-enabled Discovery and Innovation (CDI)” to create revolutionary science and engineering outcomes will be presented.

    All the CDC participants are invited to attend this informative session.


    How to Present Your Work and Yourself

    Th 12:15 – 13:00

    Grand Ballroom A

    Organizers:

     

    chowdhury
       

    Fahmida N. Chowdhury
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette

    win

     

    May-Win Thein
    University of New Hampshire

     

    Chair:

    May-Win Thein (University of New Hampshire)

    Co-Chair:

    Fahmida N. Chowdhury (University of Louisiana at Lafayette)

    Presenting yourself at a job interview, and presenting your work to a technical or non-technical audience are very important skills for professional success. In this session, Dr. James Spall of the Applied Physics Laboratory (Johns Hopkins University) will give some tips and pointers on technical presentations that will be useful for beginners and advanced researchers alike. Then, Prof. Dawn Tilbury and Dr. Jeanie Falcon will review basic job search processes for academia and industry, highlighting the differences. Prof. Tilbury was chair of the faculty search committee at the University of Michigan in 2006-2007. Dr. Falcon is a senior engineer at National Instruments and has been involved in hiring both at NI and with their alliance member companies.

    Presentations:

    •  James C. Spall, Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory (20 min.)
    • Dawn Tilbury, University of Michigan (15 min.)
    • Jeanie Falcon, National Instruments (15 min.)
    • Q&A (10 min.)

     

    Maple Connectivity Tools for Simulink®/MATLAB®

    Th 12:15 – 12:45

    Grand Salon 3

    If you’re a user of Simulink®, then you’ll already know that model-based design has brought huge benefits to the engineering systems design process. You will also know that Simulink has several inherent weaknesses that impede the development of high-fidelity models of dynamic systems, particularly where execution speed is important.

    This presentation will introduce you to the power of the Maple product line for rapidly developing solutions and deriving highly efficient engineering system models for easy implementation in your simulation tool-chain.  In 30 minutes, you will learn how to:
    ·         reduce project time “from weeks to days” by making engineering math work for you
    ·         generate optimal design parameters using automated optimization tools
    ·         import Simulink models into Maple for analysis and simplification
    ·         rapidly develop physical models from first principles for easy implementation in Simulink

    This presentation will demonstrate Maplesoft's range of products for engineering, including:
    ·         Maple 11
    ·         The Maple Toolbox for MATLAB
    ·         BlockBuilder for Simulink
    ·         BlockImporter for Simulink

     

    Controls at United Technologies Research Center

    Fr 12:15 – 13:15

    Elmwood Room

    Organizers:

     

    AB_11_05_2
       

     

    Andrzej Banaszuk
    United Technologies Corporation

    picture-clas-jacobson

     

    Clas Jacobson
    United Technologies Corporation

    This presentation presents career opportunities in controls at UTRC. The context of critical infrastructure - buildings and transportation systems - is used in the talk to present product development processes in United Technologies Corporation (UTC) (www.utc.com). UTC is a large ($48B in 2006 revenues) global company with market presence in both building systems (Carrier which manufactures and markets HVAC/R systems, Otis which manufacture and markets elevators, UTC Fire & Security which markets and manufactures fire safety and access control systems and UTC Power which manufactures and markets fuel cells and CHP systeems) and aerospace systems (Sikorsky which manufactures and markets rotorcraft, Hamilton-Sundstrand which manufactures and markets a wide range of products including environmental control systems and power distribution systems and Pratt & Whitney which manufactures and markets gas turbines).  In all of these business units control technology is a key enabling technology to achieve high performance and to maintain product reliablity across the entire range of operating conditions that products are used in.

    The drivers that are forcing engineering of large complex systems are considered in this talk from the perspective of market pressures for cost reduction, environmental pressures from particularly from the issues of energy conservation and global warming and also technology pressures particularly found in engineering safety critical systems.  A key technology enabler to overcome engineering development barriers are found in systems engineering and controls.

    Controls technology involves a range of different disciplines. UTC carries out product development using physics based modeling and in particular the development of dynamic system level models is a key enabling technology. Model based algorithm development and model based implementation into networked embedded platforms are critical to controls at UTC. In addition a research focus area for controls is the development of design flows or systems engineering, particularly based on platform based design, is important in the development of controls to position control design early in the design flow to be able to fully realize the opportunities of control for increased product functionality.